how often should skaters replace their roller skate helmets

Stay Safe on Wheels: The Essential Guide to Replacing Your Roller Skate Helmet and Why Timely Updates Matter

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Alright, let’s break it down really simply – when do you give your trusty skate helmet the old heave-ho?

First off, if you take a tumble and your head hits the deck, that helmet’s got to go. It’s done its duty. Even if it looks fine, it could be hiding some battle scars inside where you can’t see them.

Next up, helmets have a shelf life, kinda like milk, but longer – around every 5 years. Think of it as a ‘best by’ date for your headgear. And if you spot any cracks or the foam looks like it’s had a gym session of its own, that’s your cue to snag a new one.

But here’s a sweaty little secret: your perspiration is kind of a big deal, because it can mess with the helmet’s foam, zapping away its shock powers.

Now, you’ll hear different things – some say swap out every 3-4 years, others say after a crash. But the golden rule? If you crash, that helmet is toast. So, take care of your cranium container, keep it away from crazy temps and the sun’s sneaky UV rays, and when it’s time to part ways, just let go.

Unveiling the Life Cycle of a Roller Skate Helmet

how often should skaters replace their roller skate helmetsPin

Let’s get into the nitty-gritty of keeping your brain safe. Your roller skate helmet isn’t immortal – it’s got an expiration date just like your favorite cereal.

If you wipe out and your head kisses the ground, it’s time for a new helmet. Even if it’s a secret on the outside, the inside could be compromised[1][5][6].

The magic number for helmet life is about 5 years. After that, you’re rolling the dice on safety[1][2][5].
Notice any cracks, dents, or the helmet just looks like it’s been through a rough patch? That’s your cue to bid it farewell[1][2][3][4][6].
A sweaty session can do more than make you stink – it can degrade the foam that’s keeping your head cushy inside that helmet[2][3].
And sometimes, the damage is like a stealth ninja – you won’t see it, but it’s there, lurking[2][3].
Regular users, mark your calendars. Every five years, treat yourself to a helmet refresh[2][3].
General consensus says if it’s been 3-4 years or you’ve crashed, it’s time for an upgrade[4].

Remember, your helmet hates extreme heat and UV rays as much as vampires do, so keep it cool and shaded. Regular check-ups for your helmet are like going to the doctor – it could save your life. Spot any damage, or if your helmet’s taken a hit, don’t think twice, just get a new one.

Stay sharp, keep your helmet fresher than your moves, and let’s keep that brain of yours as protected as a VIP in a bulletproof limo.

The Inside Scoop on Standards by Helmet Manufacturers

Alright, let’s navigate the maze of safety standards when picking out a roller skate helmet – because let’s face it, we want our heads in the game, not the game on our heads!

Peek at any quality helmet and you’ll see it’s chummy with safety bigwigs like ASTMF2040 and the U.S. CPSC[2]. These aren’t just fancy acronyms; they’re your peace of mind in sticker form. Go for the gold and grab a dual-certified helmet that bows to both US and ASTM standards – it’s like a double thumbs-up for your noggin[2].

Now, the U.S. CPSC kinda nudges us towards bike-rated helmets for roller skating[2]. It took a hot minute, but ASTM finally tipped their hats and said, “Alright, let’s craft a standard for inline skating helmets,” which is a big win for our circle of skaters[3].

The devil’s in the details with these safety standards. Each one has its own cocktail of tests, rituals, and rules to slap that certification on the helmet[5]. If you’ve heard of the DOT standard being the “basic” one, don’t be fooled – it’s got its own tough-love tests to pass[5].

And here’s a fun fact: the Lifer Helmet isn’t just any helmet; it’s like the Hercules of helmets, certified to take multiple hits and still keep your thinker intact, boasting protection that’s up to five times beefier than those soft foam pretenders[6].

So, here’s the rundown: pick a helmet that’s got the safety seal of approval from the ASTMF2040 and the U.S. CPSC. If it’s dual-certified, you’re skating on cloud nine. Bicycle-rated for roller skating? You bet. And remember, just because a standard seems “basic” doesn’t mean it’s not robust. And for those who play hard – consider a multi-impact helmet like the Lifer to keep you rolling safe.

Safety’s no accident, so gear up right, and let’s keep those skate sessions smooth and secure.

Decoding Helmet Deterioration

Let’s break down the lowdown on helmet wear and tear:

**1. After a Crash:** Your helmet has your back – or, rather, your head – but it can only take so much. If your noggin meets the ground in a collision, your helmet’s integrity may be compromised. So, after any crash where your head plays “ground and pound,” it’s time to bid adieu to your trusty helmet.

**2. The 5-Year Rule:** Helmets age like fine wine, but unlike wine, they’re not meant to last forever. Think of your helmet as having a best-by date. Around every five years, it’s like a birthday for your headgear. Time to unwrap a new one.

**3. Visible Damage:** What you see is what you should believe when it comes to your helmet. If there are any cracks, bumps, or visible damage, it’s waving a red flag, saying, “I’m no longer your guardian angel.” Sayonara, old friend!

**4. Sweat Woes:** Your helmet’s inner shell is a foam superhero, absorbing shocks like a champ. But it has a kryptonite – sweat. Over time, sweat can weaken this foam fortress, rendering it less effective. Keep that in mind during your sweaty skating sessions.

**5. Hidden Dangers:** Sometimes, the real damage lies beneath the surface. Your helmet might look pristine on the outside, but inside, it could be as broken as a bad skateboard trick. Even though it’s not visible, the damage can still put your head at risk.

**6. Regular Replacements:** To keep things simple, make a pact with yourself to swap out your helmet every five years. It’s like renewing your subscription to head protection. No one wants an outdated subscription, right?

**7. Crash Course:** In case you’re not into the 5-year deal, a general rule of thumb is to replace your helmet every 3-4 years or after a crash. It’s like giving it a promotion – from old reliable to new and improved.

**8. Sneaky Exterior:** Don’t be fooled by appearances. Even if the outer plastic shell on your helmet looks brand spanking new, the interior foam might be screaming for retirement. It’s like having a fancy car with a rusty engine under the hood.

**9. Extreme Conditions:** Your helmet’s life story depends on its environment. If it’s living the high life in scorching heat or high humidity, it might age faster than a Hollywood star. Consider the environment in your helmet’s life plan.

In summary, your helmet’s gotta go if you crash, hit the 5-year milestone, or show any visible damage. Sweat can be its silent enemy, so beware. And remember, appearances can be deceiving – even in the helmet world. So, keep your head cool and safe out there!

The Science Behind Skate Helmets

1. Safety Standards: When you’re shopping for a roller skate helmet, you want to make sure it’s up to snuff. Look for helmets that meet safety standards set by organizations like the ASTMF2040 and the U.S. CPSC. It’s like the gold seal of approval for your noggin’s protection.

2. Dual-Certified Delight: Dual-certified helmets are the real MVPs. They meet both US and ASTM safety standards, making them a smart choice for roller skating and other wheeled shenanigans. Double the certification, double the peace of mind.

3. Bicycle Brilliance: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission gives a thumbs-up to bicycle-rated helmets for roller skating. So, if you’re strapping on skates and hitting the pavement, consider a helmet that’s been bike-approved.

4. The Purpose of Helmets: Helmets aren’t just fancy headgear; they’re your trusty defenders. They’re designed to shield your noggin from injuries that can happen during falls, collisions with other skaters or objects, and those sneaky rotational forces that come into play during impacts.

5. Enter MIPS: Say hello to the Multi-Directional Impact Protection System (MIPS). This is the tech wizardry that takes helmet protection up a notch. MIPS offers top-notch defense against rotational forces during impacts, making it a game-changer for your safety.

6. Brain-Mimicking Magic: How does MIPS work its magic? It places a low-friction layer between the helmet’s interior and your head. This layer allows for slight movement, mimicking your brain’s natural protection mechanism. It’s like your helmet is speaking your brain’s language.

7. Replacement Rules: Remember, helmets have an expiration date. If your head takes a tumble to the ground in a crash, it’s time to bid adieu to your old helmet. And don’t forget the 5-year rule – it’s like giving your helmet a retirement plan. Plus, visible damage like cracks or bumps? That’s a sign it’s time for a new one.

8. The Sweat Factor: Sweat is another helmet enemy. It can ruin the foam that makes up the inner shell and absorbs shocks. So, stay cool, but keep your sweat in check.

9. Hidden Hazards: Sometimes, the helmet’s damage is hidden from plain sight. Even if it looks pristine on the outside, the inside could be as cracked as your favorite joke. Always better to be safe than sorry.

10. Environmental Impact: Your helmet’s life story depends on where and how you use it. Whether it’s battling summer heat or surviving the rain, consider your helmet’s environment in the grand scheme of things.

In a nutshell, look for helmets meeting those safety standards, dual-certified for double protection, and consider the bicycle-rated ones for roller skating. Helmets are your guardians against head woes, and MIPS is the superhero tech in the game. Don’t forget the rules: crash equals replacement, the 5-year plan, and visible damage means it’s time to part ways. Sweat can be a sneaky foe, and helmet damage can hide behind a pristine exterior. Keep it safe out there, and remember, your helmet’s life is an adventure!

Fact-Checking Common Helmet Misconceptions

Let’s clear the air and debunk some common helmet myths, my friend:

**1. Breathing Easy:** First off, helmets don’t turn you into Darth Vader. The myth that helmets make it hard to breathe is just hot air. They’re designed to allow you to breathe comfortably while keeping your noggin safe.

**2. Not One-Size-Fits-All:** There’s more than one flavor of bike helmet! Don’t fall for the myth that there’s only a single type. Helmets come in various styles and designs to suit different activities and preferences.

**3. Vision Unobstructed:** Helmets aren’t here to block your view like a blindfold in a pirate movie. They’re crafted to protect your head while keeping your peepers wide open to the world around you.

**4. No Neck Snapping:** Worried about helmets causing neck injuries? Don’t be. Modern helmets are designed to distribute impact forces evenly, reducing the risk of neck injuries. So, you can tilt your head without fear.

**5. Stay Cool, Stay Safe:** Helmets may look like they trap heat, but they’re built with ventilation to keep your noggin cool. The myth about them being sweat saunas is just that – a myth.

**6. Hear Ye, Hear Ye:** Your helmet won’t put you in a silent world. There’s no need to worry about hearing loss due to helmet use. You’ll still hear the world around you just fine.

**7. Safety Superheroes:** Helmets aren’t mere fashion statements; they’re your safety sidekicks. The myth that they don’t significantly boost safety is way off the mark. They’re your first line of defense against head injuries.

**8. DOT Deliberation:** Some might question the thoroughness of the DOT helmet safety standard, but it’s a solid measure of safety. It’s essential to trust in established safety standards.

To sum it up, helmets are your trusted guardians against head injuries. They won’t hinder your breathing, come in various styles, maintain your vision, or cause neck issues. Plus, they’re designed for comfort, won’t mess with your hearing, and definitely boost safety. So, remember to choose a helmet that meets the right safety standards, replace it when needed, and keep your cool while staying safe on your skating adventures!

Citations


[1] https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/helmet-safety-ratings-101
[2] https://www.studds.com/blog/10-common-helmet-myths-and-misconceptions-debunke
[3] https://sapmotors.com/2022/10/22/5-common-helmet-myths-misconceptions-india/
[4] https://youtube.com/watch?v=QQgE66WK7bw
[5] https://youtube.com/watch?v=j3-fihRpfaQ
[6] https://www.championhelmets.com/us/magazine/post/Motorcycle-Helmet-Myths-Debunked

Is My Helmet’s Expiry a Calendar Event?

Absolutely, let’s clear up the helmet expiration mystery:

**1. No Calendar Date:** Helmets don’t come with an expiration date like a carton of milk. Instead, they have a date of manufacture stamp that’s akin to a clock face. It’s up to you to do some mental math to figure out when it’s time to bid your helmet farewell.

**2. Wear and Tear Trumps Calendar:** While knowing the expiration date is handy, it’s even more critical to keep a close eye on your helmet. The key is to check it regularly and give it the boot as soon as you spot any signs of wear or damage.

**3. General Guideline:** To keep things simple, the general recommendation is to replace helmets every three to five years. But, this timeline can vary based on usage and exposure to the elements. Think UV radiation, moisture, and just everyday wear and tear.

**4. Crash Equals Dash:** Remember, if your head takes a tumble and kisses the ground in a crash, it’s time for your helmet to retire. Cracks, bumps, or visible damage are also red flags that scream “new helmet, please!”

In a nutshell, don’t wait for a calendar date to magically appear on your helmet. Keep a watchful eye, replace it every few years, and say goodbye if it takes a hit or shows any signs of wear and tear. Your helmet’s mission is to protect your noggin, so keep it fresh and ready for action!

If It Isn’t Broken, Should We Fix It?

Let’s clear the air and debunk some misconceptions about helmet replacement and repair:

**1. Impact-Based Timelines:** Contrary to the myth, helmets don’t have a universal lifespan of 2-10 years based on their impact performance. Instead, the key factors for replacement are crashes, visible damage, and regular wear and tear.

**2. DIY Repairs:** Another common myth is that you can perform DIY repairs on a damaged helmet. Unfortunately, helmets are not like a broken toy that you can fix with glue or tape. Once a helmet has taken a hit or has cracked foam, it’s time to bid it farewell.

**3. Indefinite Use:** Helmets are not immortal. Even if they look pristine on the outside, they can be compromised internally. The myth that you can use them indefinitely as long as they’re not visibly damaged is risky business. Remember, your head’s safety is at stake!

**4. Sweat and Inner Damage:** Sweat is a sneaky culprit. It can seep into the foam, which is essential for shock absorption. Over time, this can weaken your helmet’s protective powers, even if you can’t see it from the outside.

**5. Safety Standards:** Always choose a helmet that meets safety standards set by organizations like the ASTMF2040 and the U.S. CPSC. These standards ensure your helmet is up to par for your protection.

**6. Proper Maintenance:** Helmets need TLC too! Don’t forget to replace any broken buckles or worn-out fitting pads to ensure your helmet fits properly and can provide maximum protection.

In a nutshell, don’t be swayed by helmet myths. Helmets should be replaced based on factors like crashes, wear and tear, or visible damage, not arbitrary timelines. DIY repairs won’t cut it, and sweat can be an unseen enemy. Stay safe, follow the guidelines, and remember that your helmet’s mission is to protect your noggin!

Does More Expensive Equate to Longer Lasting?

The price of a helmet does not necessarily equate to longer-lasting. The lifespan of a helmet depends on various factors such as usage, care, and abuse. The general recommendation is to replace helmets every three to five years, depending on usage and exposure to elements such as UV radiation, moisture, and normal wear and tear. The quality of the helmet’s construction and materials also plays a role in its lifespan. For example, polycarbonate (plastic) helmets usually expire after five years, provided they are properly maintained. Fibre composite and carbon fibre helmets last longer, between eight and 10 years, provided they have no defects and were not dropped or otherwise struck. However, helmets should be replaced after any crash where your head makes contact with the ground, roughly every 5 years, or if they have any cracks, bumps, or visible damage. Sweat can also ruin the foam, which the inner shell is made of and which makes the shell shock-absorbing. The helmet may well be split inside even though it is not visible to the naked eye. Finally, helmets are not repairable after a crash or if the foam is cracked. It’s crucial to choose a helmet that meets safety standards set by organizations such as the ASTMF2040 and the U.S. CPSC. Dual-certified helmets that meet both US and ASTM safety standards are a good choice for roller skating and other skating activities[1][2][3][4][5][6].

Your Ultimate Guide to Replacing Roller Skate Helmets

Okay, so we’ve debunked our myths and dusted our facts about helmet replacement. So, how about a guided tour on the when and how to replace your skating crown?

Deciphering the Telltale Signs for Replacement

Here are the telltale signs for helmet replacement:

– The helmet is more than 5 years old[1][3][4].
– The helmet has been involved in a crash or has made contact with any surface[1][3][5].
– The helmet has any cracks, dents, gouges, or flat spots[4].
– The helmet has been dropped or crushed on a hard surface[3][5].
– The helmet has been decorated with paint or stickers[1].
– The helmet has been recalled[1].
– The helmet has any visible damage[2][5].
– The helmet has any signs of wear or damage, including fading colors, loose padding, or broken buckles[1][6].
– The helmet has been exposed to extreme temperatures or UV radiation from the sun[1][6].
– The helmet has been exposed to hair products, makeup, or sunscreen that can compromise the materials[4].
– The helmet doesn’t fit properly or gives you a headache[3].

It’s important to replace helmets every three to five years, depending on usage and exposure to elements such as UV radiation, moisture, and normal wear and tear. Additionally, helmets should be replaced after any crash where your head makes contact with the ground, or if they have any cracks, bumps, or visible damage. Sweat can also ruin the foam, which the inner shell is made of and which makes the shell shock-absorbing. The helmet may well be split inside even though it is not visible to the naked eye. Finally, helmets are not repairable after a crash or if the foam is cracked. It’s crucial to choose a helmet that meets safety standards set by organizations such as the ASTMF2040 and the U.S. CPSC. Dual-certified helmets that meet both US and ASTM safety standards are a good choice for roller skating and other skating activities[1][2][3][4][5][6].

Where to Buy and What to Look For?

When you’re on the hunt for the perfect roller skate helmet, keep these pointers in mind:

**1. New Helmet for You:** Remember, it’s all about you. Don’t settle for a used helmet that once belonged to someone else, even if they were a cool rider. Your helmet should fit you, not the previous owner. Your safety is top priority.

**2. Know Your Noggin:** Get familiar with your head’s measurements in centimeters or inches and its general shape. This knowledge will help you find a helmet that fits like a glove – or in this case, like a helmet.

**3. The Break-In Factor:** Don’t aim for a helmet that fits like a glove from day one. It’s going to break in a bit, so think about it becoming slightly roomier over time. It’s like breaking in a new pair of skates.

**4. Function Over Fashion:** While funky colors and designs are tempting, don’t let your style choices dictate your helmet selection. Safety trumps aesthetics. Find a helmet that fits you snugly to protect your noggin from potential head injuries.

**5. Replacement Timeline:** Helmets aren’t forever. The general rule is to replace them every three to five years, depending on how often you use them and the conditions they face, like UV radiation, moisture, and everyday wear and tear.

**6. Post-Crash and Visible Damage:** If your head and the ground become friends in a crash, it’s time to say goodbye to your current helmet. Also, if you spot any cracks, bumps, or visible damage, don’t hesitate to invest in a new one. Your head is worth it.

**7. Beware of Sweat:** Sweat may be your body’s natural cooling system, but it’s no friend to your helmet’s foam. Over time, it can weaken the inner shell, so keep it in check.

**8. Hidden Hazards:** Sometimes, the real damage is on the inside, even if it’s not visible. So, don’t judge your helmet by its cover – or its exterior appearance.

**9. Quality Matters:** The construction and materials of your helmet play a significant role in its lifespan. Don’t skimp on quality; your head deserves the best.

**10. Dual-Certified Delight:** Opt for dual-certified helmets that meet both US and ASTM safety standards. They’re a smart choice for roller skating and other skating adventures.

**11. Padding Perfection:** Look for helmets with easily removable and multiple thicknesses of padding. This not only provides a better fit but also ensures comfort during your rides.

**12. Comfort is Key:** Your helmet should fit snugly but not be a head-hugging nightmare. Your head should partially compress the soft foam pads inside, even before you tighten the straps.

**13. Size Selection:** Choose a size that fits as closely as possible without causing discomfort. It’s about striking that balance between snug and comfortable.

In a nutshell, prioritize safety and fit when shopping for your roller skate helmet. Don’t settle for used helmets, know your head measurements, and don’t be swayed by flashy designs. Keep an eye on your helmet’s lifespan, replace it when needed, and remember that your head’s well-being is the ultimate goal.

Tips and Tricks to Keep Your Helmet Young

Here are some tips and tricks to keep your helmet young:

– Always buy a new helmet when you buy a used motorcycle. You don’t want his/her used helmet, you need one that fits you, not them[1].
– Know your head’s measurement in cm/in and general shape[1].
– Never buy a size that fits perfect the day you try it on in the store, it will always break in so you need to assume that it will loosen up as it breaks in[1].
– Never buy a helmet based on colors/graphics/designs; every helmet has a different fit/shape. You *must* find a helmet that fits you well so it can save your brain from serious head injury/trauma, not your self-image[1].
– The general recommendation is to replace helmets every three to five years, depending on usage and exposure to elements such as UV radiation, moisture, and normal wear and tear[2][3][4][5].
– Helmets should be replaced after any crash where your head makes contact with the ground, roughly every 5 years, or if they have any cracks, bumps, or visible damage[1][2][3][4][5][6].
– Sweat can also ruin the foam, which the inner shell is made of and which makes the shell shock-absorbing[2][3][5].
– The helmet may well be split inside even though it is not visible to the naked eye[2][3][5][6].
– The quality of the helmet’s construction and materials also plays a role in its lifespan[2][3][4][5][6].
– Dual-certified helmets that meet both US and ASTM safety standards are a good choice for roller skating and other skating activities[1][2][5].
– Look for helmets that have easily removable and multiple thicknesses of padding, which provide a better fit as a result[3].
– Softer, more supple chin retention systems and leather chin straps are also features of more expensive options[3].
– Helmets should fit snugly but not uncomfortably, with your head partially compressing the soft foam pads inside—even before the straps are tightened[4].
– Store helmets collar side down on a shelf or use a helmet bag[4][5].
– Don’t use a mannequin head, it will compress the interior padding[4].
– Never hang helmets by the chin strap[4].
– Don’t store your helmet near fuel, cleaning fluids, or excessive heat as these can damage materials used in the construction[4].
– Use the proper materials to clean your helmet, such as mild soap and water[2].
– Avoid using harsh chemicals or solvents that can damage the helmet’s materials[2].
– Give your helmet a good scrub periodically to keep it in good shape[2].
– Transport your helmet carefully to avoid damage[4].
– Never ride with your arm shoved through the aperture or fastened strap of a spare helmet[4].
– The only ways to carry a helmet are to use a helmet bag or to wrap it with soft cloth or bubble wrap[4].
– Always replace a helmet after a crash. Damages may not be visible, but the foam can lose its integrity[1][6].

In summary, to keep your helmet young, it’s important to choose a helmet that fits you well and meets safety standards set by organizations such as the ASTMF2040 and the U.S. CPSC. Additionally, helmets should be replaced every three to five years, depending on usage and exposure to elements such as UV radiation, moisture, and normal wear and tear. Sweat can also ruin the foam, which the inner shell is made of and which makes the shell shock-absorbing. The helmet may well be split inside even though it is not visible to the naked eye. Finally, it’s important to store your helmet properly, transport it carefully, and clean it with mild soap and water.

What are the Key Factors to Consider When Choosing a New Skating Helmet?

When choosing a skating helmet, several key factors must be considered. Firstly, ensure the helmet fits properly and securely on your head. Look for helmets with adjustable straps to ensure a snug fit. Additionally, opt for helmets that meet safety standards and have proper ventilation to keep you cool during intense skating sessions. Remember, choosing a skating helmet plays a crucial role in ensuring your safety on the rink.

If Helmets could Talk, They’d Say “Replace Me!”

Maneuvering the rollerblading landscape is an exhilarating ride- a mix of “Whoooa!” and “Awww!”. Your trusty helmet does an exceptional job at turning more of those moments into exclamations of excitement, and fewer into cries of pain. Like a quiet, dutiful butler, it does its best to keep your esteemed head from unpleasant encounters. But, alas, your noble helmet can’t be a Methuselah; it has its limits, even if you’re the Picassos of rollerblading.

In the rollerblading code, it’s etched in stone – your helmet isn’t a family heirloom to be cherished over generations. It’s not up for antique value appreciation or to be worn till the stench keeps the crowd at bay. It’s your guardian angel of the skate park, the Captain America shield for your skull. It deserves a timely, respectful retirement, while it’s still a pro and not a pushover. And trust me, your top-quality skating helmet is not pulling off a Benjamin Button; it becomes a frail grandad with time. ‘Not visually aged’, ‘Only slightly damaged’, ‘As comfy as my plush pillow’ – these excuses are like your last winter’s hot chocolate, stale and kept too long.

Like your rollerblade wheels, these high-end helmets for rollerblading need a regular check and possible change. The signs of distress are there, with little red flags waving frantically, like a tiny dancer on your helmet, howling for a replacement. Remember the cautionary tales, the misconceptions we busted, and the handy tips we dived into. Keep those in check, and your head will owe you big time.

To wrap it up, if the helmet sanctuary in your closet houses a bunch of prehistoric species, it’s time for an upgrade and a helmet shopping spree! It’s a rallying call to all gliding ninjas out there – Rekindle your rollerblading romance with a new soldier of safety – a fresh, unscathed helmet that fits like a dream.

And remember, a laughing face is far better than a helmeted head – irrespective of each one’s abilities to crack a joke!

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